Feb 25, 1976

Ferredoxin-dependent photosynthetic reduction of nitrate and nitrite by particles of Anacystis nidulans

Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry
C ManzanoM Losada

Abstract

The dark and light reduction of nitrate and nitrite by cell-free preparations of the blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans has been investigated. The three following methods have been successfully applied to the preparation of active particulate fractions from the alga cells: (a) shaking with glass beads, (b) lysozyme treatment and lysis of the resulting protoplasts, and (c) sonication. The two enzymes of the nitrate-reducing system-namely, nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase-are firmly bound to the isolated pigment-containing particles, and can be easily solubilized by prolonging the vibration or sonication time. Both enzymes-whether solubilized or bound to the particles-depend on reduced ferredoxin as the immediate electron donor. In its presence, the alga particles catalyze the gradual photoreduction of nitrate to nitrite and ammonia, a process that can thus be considered as one of the most simple and relevant examples of Photosynthesis. Some of the properties of nitrate reductase have been studied. Nitrate reductase as well as nitrite reductase are adaptive enzymes repressed by ammonia.

Mentioned in this Paper

Pathologic Cytolysis
Synechococcus
Ferredoxin
Enzymes, antithrombotic
Nitrates and nitrites
Darkness
Lysozyme Test
Nitrite Reductase
Ferredoxin Activity
Protoplasts

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