Sep 10, 2017

"Fleaing" the Plague: Adaptations of Yersinia pestis to Its Insect Vector That Lead to Transmission

Annual Review of Microbiology
B Joseph HinnebuschDavid M Bland

Abstract

Interest in arthropod-borne pathogens focuses primarily on how they cause disease in humans. How they produce a transmissible infection in their arthropod host is just as critical to their life cycle, however. Yersinia pestis adopts a unique life stage in the digestive tract of its flea vector, characterized by rapid formation of a bacterial biofilm that is enveloped in a complex extracellular polymeric substance. Localization and adherence of the biofilm to the flea foregut is essential for transmission. Here, we review the molecular and genetic mechanisms of these processes and present a comparative evaluation and updated model of two related transmission mechanisms.

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Mentioned in this Paper

Establishment and Maintenance of Localization
Extracellular
Acclimatization
Biological Adaptation
Plague
Insect Vectors
Yersinia Infections
Yersinia
Plague Vaccine
Adaptation

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