Nov 1, 1993

Fluorodeoxyglucose cell incorporation as an index of cell proliferation: evaluation of accuracy in cell culture

European Journal of Nuclear Medicine
D O SlosmanB S Polla

Abstract

The use of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET) is recognized as an accurate tool for the specific diagnosis and staging of cancer. It has also been proposed for the monitoring of anticancer therapy. FDG cell incorporation reflects glycolytic activity whereas inhibition of cell proliferation corresponds to an efficient cancer treatment. The relationship between FDG incorporation and cell proliferation has yet to be demonstrated. Therefore, we aimed to correlate the effects of the toxic agents bleomycin and unlabelled meta-iodobenzylguanidine (mIBG) on cellular metabolism and proliferation. We determined the in vitro metabolic and cytotoxic effects of bleomycin and mIBG by measuring the incorporation of fluorine-18 FDG (%UFDG) and hydrogen-3 thymidine (%UTHY) in cells of the human premonocytic line U937 in the presence of increasing concentrations of these agents. Proliferation rate of these cells was studied by means of limiting dilution analysis. %UTHY appeared more sensitive to bleomycin or mIBG-mediated cell injury than %UFDG. After 1 h of exposure to 0.5 microM bleomycin, %UTHY was significantly reduced to 62.0% +/- 10.4% of control value whereas %UFDG remained unchanged (91.6% +/- 5.3%). Similar ...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

Metabolic Process, Cellular
Antineoplastic Agents
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon
Cell Injury
Thymidine
Positron-Emission Tomography
Cell Culture Techniques
Neoplasms
Fluorine
Bleomycin

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