Nov 7, 2019

From the prion-like propagation hypothesis to therapeutic strategies of anti-tau immunotherapy

Acta Neuropathologica
Morvane ColinLuc Buée

Abstract

The term "propagon" is used to define proteins that may transmit misfolding in vitro, in tissues or in organisms. Among propagons, misfolded tau is thought to be involved in the pathogenic mechanisms of various "tauopathies" that include Alzheimer's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, and argyrophilic grain disease. Here, we review the available data in the literature and point out how the prion-like tau propagation has been extended from Alzheimer's disease to tauopathies. First, in Alzheimer's disease, the progression of tau aggregation follows stereotypical anatomical stages which may be considered as spreading. The mechanisms of the propagation are now subject to intensive and controversial research. It has been shown that tau may be secreted in the interstitial fluid in an active manner as reflected by high and constant concentration of extracellular tau during Alzheimer's pathology. Animal and cell models have been devised to mimic tau seeding and propagation, and despite their limitations, they have further supported to the prion-like propagation hypothesis. Finally, such new ways of thinking have led to different therapeutic strategies in anti-tau immunotherapy among tauopathies and have stimulated new clinical tri...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

Biological Markers
Study
In Vivo
Tauopathies
Research
Strategy
Extracellular
Alzheimer's Disease
Protein Aggregation, Pathological
Literature

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