Functional complementation of yeast ribosomal P0 protein with Plasmodium falciparum P0

Gene
K ArunaShobhona Sharma

Abstract

A complex of three phosphoproteins (P0, P1 and P2) constitutes the stalk region at the GTPase center of the eukaryotic large ribosomal subunit, amongst which the protein P0 plays the most crucial role. Earlier studies have shown the functional complementation of the conditional P0-null mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (W303dGP0) with orthologous P0 genes from fungal and mammalian organisms, but not the protozoan parasite Leishmania infantum. In this paper we show that the PfP0 gene from the protozoan malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum can functionally complement the conditional P0-null W303dGP0 mutant of S. cerevisiae. Unlike the above orthologous genes, PfP0 gene could also rescue the D67dGP0 strain, which in addition to being a conditional null for ScP0 gene, is a null-mutant for both ScP1alpha and beta genes. However, under stress conditions such as high temperature, salt and osmolarity, PfP0 gene could not rescue D67dGP0 strain. Ribosomes purified from W303dGP0 carrying PfP0 gene did not contain ScP1 protein, indicating a lack of binding of ScP1 to PfP0 protein. Yeast 2-hybrid analysis further confirmed the lack of binding of ScP1 to PfP0 protein. The polymerizing activities of ribosomes with ScP0 or PfP0 protein, in ...Continue Reading

References

Oct 13, 2012·The Journal of Biological Chemistry·Sudipta DasShobhona Sharma
Oct 13, 2011·PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases·Elizabeth BilslandStephen G Oliver
Mar 2, 2011·Journal of Molecular Recognition : JMR·Cristian R SmulskiMariano J Levin
May 24, 2011·Molecular and Biochemical Parasitology·Sujaan DasGotam K Jarori

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Related Concepts

Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins
Plasmodium
Galactosidase Activity
TRNAP1 gene
Tissue Membrane
Galactose Measurement
Genus: Leishmania
Elongation Factor
Ribosomal Proteins
Pellet Formation

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