Fungal antigens as a source of sensitization and respiratory disease in Scottish maltworkers

Clinical Allergy
W BlythM Greenberg

Abstract

Mycological and serological studies were carried out as part of a survey of respiratory disease in Scottish maltworkers. 70% of stained sputum smears from 574 workers showed the presence of higher plant cells and/or myclelia, and the spores of common environmental fungi. Penicillium spp. (90%), Rhizopus stolonifer (48%) and yeasts (53%) were the dominant fungi in 699 sputum cultures, and showed a similar proportional distribution in 327 samples of grain, malt, culms and dusts from fifty-six maltings. 57% of 711 men were serologically positive for fungi, 22% for Aspergillus fumigatus, 20% for A. clavatus, 10% for A. niger, 16% for Cladosporium herbarum and over 3% for Rhizopus stolonifer, 6% of 132 men were positive for Penicillium cyclopium. No precipitating antibodies to antigens from Alternaria tenuis, Aureobasidium pullulans, Candida albicans, Geotrichum candidum, Rhodotorula glutinis or Trichoderma viride were detected in tests of forty sera. Sera from the 5.2% of men with symptoms of extrinsic allergic alveolitis showed increased reactivity to mycelial antigens from Aspergillus clavatus. The fungus was cultured from 21% of maltings, 7% of all environmental samples and from the sputa of 8% of maltworkers.

References

Feb 5, 1975·Journal of the American Chemical Society·J ClardyR Wightman
Feb 28, 1976·British Medical Journal·I W GrantW Blyth
Jan 1, 1974·Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences·E J Bardana
Jun 1, 1974·Clinical Allergy·T GhoseJ Dill
May 1, 1968·Thorax·H F RiddleI W Grant
Oct 1, 1971·American Journal of Clinical Pathology·M A GordonJ W Fenton
Jan 1, 1965·Thorax·J PEPYS, P A JENKINS

Citations

Nov 30, 2005·Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology : Official Publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology·Michael C Zacharisen, William Schoenwetter
Apr 9, 2002·The Lancet Infectious Diseases·David W DenningJoan W Bennett
Dec 19, 2003·Nucleic Acids Research·J E MabeyDavid W Denning
Nov 29, 2008·Nucleic Acids Research·Jane E Mabey GilsenanPaul Bowyer
Nov 16, 2010·Eukaryotic Cell·Gary P MoranDerek J Sullivan
Apr 12, 2008·PLoS Genetics·Natalie D FedorovaWilliam C Nierman
Sep 13, 2008·PLoS Pathogens·Andrew McDonaghElaine Bignell
Jul 17, 2014·Trends in Parasitology·Armand M KurisSusanne H Sokolow
Oct 8, 2011·Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America·Michael C Zacharisen, Jordan N Fink
Aug 31, 2011·Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology : Official Publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology·Richard W Weber
Dec 2, 1978·The Medical Journal of Australia·A B Breslin

Related Concepts

Alternaria (fungus)
Extrinsic Allergic Alveolitis
Antigens, Fungal
Aspergillus
Triticale
Cladosporium
Lung Diseases
Occupational Diseases
Penicillium
Immune Precipitates

Related Feeds

Aspergillosis (ASM)

Aspergillosis is the name given to a wide variety of diseases caused by infection by fungi of the genus Aspergillus. Aspergillosis occurs in chronic or acute forms which are clinically very distinct. Most cases of acute aspergillosis occur in patients with severely compromised immune systems. Chronic colonization or infection can cause complications in people with underlying respiratory illnesses. Discover the latest research on aspergillosis here.

Aspergillosis

Aspergillosis is the name given to a wide variety of diseases caused by infection by fungi of the genus Aspergillus. Aspergillosis occurs in chronic or acute forms which are clinically very distinct. Most cases of acute aspergillosis occur in patients with severely compromised immune systems. Chronic colonization or infection can cause complications in people with underlying respiratory illnesses. Discover the latest research on aspergillosis here.

Candidiasis (ASM)

Candidiasis is a common fungal infection caused by Candida and it can affect many parts for the body including mucosal membranes as well as the gastrointestinal, urinary, and respiratory tracts. Here is the latest research.

Candida albicans

Candida albicans is an opportunistic, fungal pathogen of humans that frequently causes superficial infections of oral and vaginal mucosal surfaces of debilitated and susceptible individuals. Discover the latest research on Candida albicans here.

Candidiasis

Candidiasis is a common fungal infection caused by Candida and it can affect many parts for the body including mucosal membranes as well as the gastrointestinal, urinary, and respiratory tracts. Here is the latest research.

Related Papers

Occupational Medicine
S J PartridgeC R Swinburn
British Journal of Industrial Medicine
O D Cuthbert, M F Gordon
© 2021 Meta ULC. All rights reserved