Nov 26, 2008

Gasping during cardiac arrest in humans is frequent and associated with improved survival

Circulation
Bentley J BobrowKarl B Kern

Abstract

The incidence and significance of gasping after cardiac arrest in humans are controversial. Two approaches were used. The first was a retrospective analysis of consecutive confirmed out-of-hospital cardiac arrests from the Phoenix Fire Department Regional Dispatch Center text files to determine the presence of gasping soon after collapse. The second was a retrospective analysis of 1218 patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in Arizona documented by emergency medical system (EMS) first-care reports to determine the incidence of gasping after arrest in relation to the various EMS arrival times. The primary outcome measure was survival to hospital discharge. An analysis of the Phoenix Fire Department Regional Dispatch Center records of witnessed and unwitnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrests with attempted resuscitation found that 44 of 113 (39%) of all arrested patients had gasping. An analysis of 1218 EMS-attended, witnessed, out-of-hospital cardiac arrests demonstrated that the presence or absence of gasping correlated with EMS arrival time. Gasping was present in 39 of 119 patients (33%) who arrested after EMS arrival, in 73 of 363 (20%) when EMS arrival was <7 minutes, in 50 of 360 (14%) when EMS arrival time was 7 to...Continue Reading

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  • Citations94

Citations

Mentioned in this Paper

Emergency Care
Gasping for Breath
Basic Cardiac Life Support
Odds Ratio
VOPP1 gene
Abnormal Breathing
Cardiopulmonary
Inspiration Function
GPRASP1 gene
THEMIS gene

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