Dec 8, 2015

Genetic diversity on the human X chromosome does not support a strict pseudoautosomal boundary

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Daniel J CotterMelissa A Wilson Sayres

Abstract

Unlike the autosomes, recombination between the X chromosome and Y chromosome often thought to be constrained to two small pseudoautosomal regions (PARs) at the tips of each sex chromosome. The PAR1 spans the first 2.7 Mb of the proximal arm of the human sex chromosomes, while the much smaller PAR2 encompasses the distal 320 kb of the long arm of each sex chromosome. In addition to the PAR1 and PAR2, there is a human-specific X-transposed region that was duplicated from the X to the Y. The X-transposed region is often not excluded from X-specific analyses, unlike the PARs, because it is not thought to routinely recombine. Genetic diversity is expected to be higher in recombining regions than in non-recombining regions because recombination reduces the effect of linked selection. In this study, we investigate patterns of genetic diversity in noncoding regions across the entire X chromosome of a global sample of 26 unrelated genetic females. We observe that genetic diversity in the PAR1 is significantly greater than the non-recombining regions (nonPARs). However, rather than an abrupt drop in diversity at the pseudoautosomal boundary, there is a gradual reduction in diversity from the recombining through the non-recombining regio...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

Study
Y Chromosome
Yttrium-90
Chromosomes, Human, X
PABX gene
Sex Chromosomes
Recombination, Genetic
SLC52A2 gene
F2RL1 gene
PRADER-WILLI/ANGELMAN REGION 1 GENE

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