Jan 18, 2016

Genetic regulation of transcriptional variation in wild-collected Arabidopsis thaliana accessions

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Yanjun ZanÖrjan Carlborg

Abstract

An increased understanding of how genetics contributes to expression variation in natural Arabidopsis thaliana populations is of fundamental importance to understand adaptation. Here, we reanalyse data from two publicly available datasets with genome-wide data on genetic and transcript variation from whole-genome and RNA-sequencing in populations of wild-collected A. thaliana accessions. We found transcripts from more than half of all genes (55%) in the leaf of all accessions. In the population with higher RNA-sequencing coverage, transcripts from nearly all annotated genes were present in the leaf of at least one of the accessions. Thousands of genes, however, were found to have high transcript levels in some accessions and no detectable transcripts in others. The presence or absence of particular gene transcripts within the accessions was correlated with the genome-wide genotype, suggesting that part of this variability was due to a genetically controlled accession-specific expression. This was confirmed using the data from the largest collection of accessions, where cis-eQTL with a major influence on the presence or absence of transcripts was detected for 349 genes. Transcripts from 172 of these genes were present in the sec...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

Gene Polymorphism
Study
Genome
Genes
Sequence Determinations, RNA
Transcription, Genetic
Gene Expression
Whole Genome Amplification
Wild bird
Adaptation

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