Oct 24, 2018

Genetic transformation of the dinoflagellate chloroplast

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Isabel NimmoChristopher J Howe

Abstract

Coral reefs are some of the most important and ecologically diverse marine environments. At the base of the reef ecosystem are dinoflagellate algae, living in symbiosis with coral. Efforts to understand the relationship between alga and coral have been greatly hampered by the lack of an appropriate dinoflagellate genetic transformation technology. By making use of the plasmid-like fragmented chloroplast genome, we have introduced novel genetic material into the dinoflagellate chloroplast genome. We have shown that the introduced genes are expressed and confer the expected phenotypes. Genetically modified cultures have been grown for five months with subculturing, maintaining the introduced genes and phenotypes. This indicates that cells continue to divide after transformation and that the transformation is stable.

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Mentioned in this Paper

Transformation, Genetic
Genes
Phylum dinoflagellata
dinoflagellate toxin
Chloroplasts
Plasmids
Dinophyceae
Laboratory Culture
Genetic Techniques
Genetic Materials

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