DOI: 10.1101/470906Nov 14, 2018Paper

Genetics of Cocaine and Methamphetamine Consumption and Preference in Drosophila melanogaster

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Chad HighfillTrudy F C Mackay

Abstract

Illicit use of psychostimulants, such as cocaine and methamphetamine, constitutes a significant public health problem. Whereas neural mechanisms that mediate the effects of these drugs are well-characterized, genetic factors that account for individual variation in susceptibility to substance abuse and addiction remain largely unknown. Drosophila melanogaster can serve as a translational model for studies on substance abuse, since flies have a dopamine transporter that can bind cocaine and methamphetamine, and exposure to these compounds elicits effects similar to those observed in people, suggesting conserved evolutionary mechanisms underlying drug responses. Here, we used the D. melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel to investigate the genetic basis for variation in psychostimulant drug consumption, to determine whether similar or distinct genetic networks underlie variation in consumption of cocaine and methamphetamine, and to assess the extent of sexual dimorphism and effect of genetic context on variation in voluntary drug consumption. Quantification of natural genetic variation in voluntary consumption, preference, and change in consumption and preference over time for cocaine and methamphetamine uncovered significant genet...Continue Reading

Related Concepts

Cocaine
Diptera
Disease Susceptibility
Drosophila
Drosophila melanogaster
Genome
Methamphetamine
Persons
Addictive Behavior
Dopamine transporter

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