Genome shuffling of Lactococcus lactis subspecies lactis YF11 for improving nisin Z production and comparative analysis

Journal of Dairy Science
Y F ZhangJ J Qiao

Abstract

Nisin has been widely used in the food industry as a safe and natural preservative to increase the shelf time of many foods. In this study, genome shuffling was applied to improve nisin Z production of Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis YF11 (YF11) via recursive protoplast fusion. Ultraviolet irradiation and diethyl sulfate mutagenesis were used to generate parental strains for genome shuffling. After 4 rounds of genome shuffling, the best-performing strain F44 was obtained, which showed dramatic improvements in tolerance to both glucose (ranging from 8 to 15% (wt/vol) and nisin (ranging from 5,000 to 14,000 IU/mL). Fed-batch fermentation showed that the nisin titer of F44 was up to 4,023 IU/mL, which was 2.4 times that of the starting strain YF11. Field emission scanning electron microscope micrographs of YF11 and F44 revealed the apparent differences in cell morphology. Whereas YF11 displayed long and thin cell morphology, F44 cells were short and thick and with a raised surface in the middle of the cell. With the increasing glucose and nisin content in the medium, cells of both YF11 and F44 tended to become shrunken; however, alterations in YF11 cells were more pronounced than those of F44 cells, especially when cultured in tole...Continue Reading

References

Dec 1, 1991·Applied and Environmental Microbiology·K A StevensT R Klaenhammer
Nov 1, 1991·European Journal of Biochemistry·J W MuldersW M De Vos
Mar 1, 1990·Journal of General Microbiology·H M DoddM J Gasson
Mar 1, 1995·Applied and Environmental Microbiology·K Siegers, K D Entian
Feb 1, 1996·Antonie van Leeuwenhoek·J Delves-BroughtonJ Hugenholtz
Apr 1, 1996·The Journal of Applied Bacteriology·C E Wolf, W R Gibbons
Feb 8, 2002·Nature·Ying-Xin ZhangStephen del Cardayré
Jun 29, 2002·Nature Biotechnology·Ranjan PatnaikStephen del Cardayré
Oct 6, 2005·Nature Reviews. Microbiology·Paul D CotterR Paul Ross
Oct 17, 2006·Applied and Environmental Microbiology·Anneke KuipersGert N Moll
Jul 20, 2007·Journal of Dairy Science·L T CaoY Mo
Sep 8, 2007·Sheng wu gong cheng xue bao = Chinese journal of biotechnology·Jun LinMing-Zi Wang
Jan 10, 2009·Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology·Z H JinP L Cen
May 26, 2009·Biotechnology Advances·Jixian GongXueming Zhao
Mar 20, 2010·Journal of Microbiological Methods·Paramjit K BajwaHung Lee
Jan 18, 2011·Antonie van Leeuwenhoek·Mervat M A El-Gendy, Ahmed M A El-Bondkly
Jan 25, 2012·Journal of Industrial Microbiology & Biotechnology·Ge JingpingPing Wenxiang
May 23, 2012·Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry·Jian-Mei LuoMin Wang
Jul 19, 2012·World Journal of Microbiology & Biotechnology·Pu ZhengZhi-Hao Sun
Aug 23, 2012·Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology·Xing-An LvXinle Liang

Citations

Jun 17, 2016·Scientific Reports·Jian ZhangJianjun Qiao
Jul 28, 2020·Applied and Environmental Microbiology·Jiaheng LiuJianjun Qiao
Jun 1, 2018·Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology·Burcu ÖzelP E J Saris
Jul 10, 2017·Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology·Jiakun QiJianjun Qiao
Dec 16, 2019·Antonie van Leeuwenhoek·Andressa FusiegerLuís Augusto Nero
Sep 25, 2020·World Journal of Microbiology & Biotechnology·Liang ChenKe Bian
Mar 28, 2018·Annual Review of Food Science and Technology·Eric Johansen

Related Concepts

Related Feeds

Bacterial Cell Wall Structure (ASM)

Bacterial cell walls are made of peptidoglycan (also called murein), which is made from polysaccharide chains cross-linked by unusual peptides containing D-amino acids. Here is the latest research on bacterial cell wall structures.

Bacterial Cell Wall Structure

Bacterial cell walls are made of peptidoglycan (also called murein), which is made from polysaccharide chains cross-linked by unusual peptides containing D-amino acids. Here is the latest research on bacterial cell wall structures.