Apr 25, 2020

Primary and recurrent glioma patient-derived orthotopic xenografts (PDOX) represent relevant patient avatars for precision medicine

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
A. GolebiewskaSimone P. Niclou

Abstract

Patient-derived cancer models are essential tools for studying tumor biology and preclinical interventions. Here, we show that glioma patient-derived orthotopic xenografts (PDOXs) enable long-term propagation of patient tumors and represent clinically relevant patient avatars. We created a large collection of PDOXs from primary and recurrent gliomas with and without mutations in IDH1, which retained histopathological, genetic, epigenetic and transcriptomic features of patient tumors with no mouse-specific clonal evolution. Longitudinal PDOX models recapitulate the limited genetic evolution of gliomas observed in patient tumors following treatment. PDOX-derived standardized tumor organoid cultures enabled assessment of drug responses, which were validated in mice. PDOXs showed clinically relevant responses to Temozolomide and to targeted treatments such as EGFR and CDK4/6 inhibitors in (epi)genetically defined groups, according to MGMT promoter and EGFR/CDK status respectively. Dianhydrogalactitol, a bifunctional alkylating agent, showed promising potential against glioblastoma. Our study underlines the clinical relevance of glioma PDOX models for translational research and personalized treatment studies.

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