PMID: 37320Jul 1, 1979

GI absorption of beta-lactam antibiotics. III: Kinetic evidence for in situ absorption of ionized species of monobasic penicillins and cefazolin from the rat small intestine and structure-absorption rate relationships

Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences
A TsujiT Yamana

Abstract

Absorption rates of monobasic beta-lactam antibiotics were measured as a function of lumen solution pH between 4 and 9 by utilizing the rat intestinal recirculating method in situ. Between pH 6.5 and 9, the absorption rate constants of ionized antibiotics were almost identical; but, at pH 4, the unionized species were highly absorbed, depending on their lipophilicity through the GI membrane lipoidal barrier. The structure-absorption rate relationship was established with the unstirred layer model.

Citations

Jan 1, 1988·General Pharmacology·L J Nuñez-VergaraJ A Squella
Dec 1, 1991·Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics·E Zinyemba, D J Morton
Dec 27, 2007·Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics·Yukiko KomoriYuji Kurosaki

Related Concepts

Metabolic Biotransformation
Totacef
Cephalosporanic Acids
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Intestinal Absorption
Intestines, Small
Penicillin
Structure-Activity Relationship

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