Glucocorticoids decrease a binding of corticotropin-releasing hormone-binding protein in human plasma

The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
T SudaH Demura

Abstract

The binding of CRH-binding protein (CRH-BP) in plasma to labeled human CRH has been examined in patients with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal disorders. Compared with that in normal subjects, CRH-BP binding decreased in patients with Cushing's syndrome of pituitary or adrenal origin and in patients who were treated with a high dose of glucocorticoids over a long period of time. On the other hand, CRH-BP binding increased in patients with Addison's disease or hypopituitarism. In patients with Addison's disease, the high level of CRH-BP binding fell to the control level after glucocorticoid replacement. In patients with Cushing's syndrome, CRH-BP binding gradually increased and reached the higher level about 1 yr after surgery. Thereafter, it returned to the control level. There was a good negative correlation between the levels of plasma cortisol and CRH-BP binding in patients with Cushing's syndrome before and after surgery. A Scatchard analysis of CRH-BP binding in patients with Cushing's syndrome and in normal subjects showed that the binding affinity was similar in both groups, but that the number of binding sites was low in patients with Cushing's syndrome. These results suggest that in human plasma, glucocorticoids decrease...Continue Reading

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Related Concepts

Human plasma
Glucocorticoid inhalants for obstructive airway disease
Receptors, Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone
CRHBP gene
SDS-PAGE
Pituitary Diseases
Glucocorticoids, Systemic
Etiology
Synaptic Receptors
Binding Protein

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