PMID: 45927Jan 1, 1975

Glycocalyx of epidermal cells in vitro: demonstration and enzymatic removal

The Journal of Investigative Dermatology
P O FritschH Hönigsmann

Abstract

Guinea-pig epidermal cells in culture possess a glycocalyx coat similar to that in vivo, as revealed by the ruthenium red stating technique. Trypsin, phospholipase C, and lysozyme do not produce any changes of the glycocalyx, while hyaluronidase and neuraminidase lead to partial and subcomplete removal respectively. Cells stripped of their glycocalyx coat by neuraminidase do not detach from the support and do not show any signs of toxicity. There is complete reconstitution of the glycocalyx within 24 hr.

References

Jun 29, 1978·Archives of Dermatological Research·D CerimeleF Serri
Apr 1, 1981·The British Journal of Dermatology·I A KingC J Paul
Oct 1, 1977·International Journal of Dermatology·J C Bystryn
Apr 1, 1977·The British Journal of Dermatology·P R Mann, H Constable
Jun 1, 1980·The British Journal of Dermatology·P R MannG M Gray
Aug 1, 1978·The Journal of Dermatology·K NishiokaS Sano

Related Concepts

Cavia
Lysozyme Test
Trypsin
Neuraminidase
Lysozyme
Neoglycoproteins
Muramidase
Electron Microscopy
Wydase
Skin

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