PMID: 3290178Mar 1, 1988Paper

Growth and formation of toxin by Clostridium botulinum in peeled, inoculated, vacuum-packed potatoes after a double pasteurization and storage at 25 degrees C

The Journal of Applied Bacteriology
B M LundS M George

Abstract

A process that claims to use a double pasteurization to produce vacuum-packed potatoes for storage at ambient temperature has been evaluated. After the first pasteurization, potatoes are vacuum-packed and stored at 25 degrees-35 degrees C for up to 24 h, which is intended to allow germination of bacterial spores, and are then pasteurized again. When potatoes were inoculated with spores of Clostridium botulinum and subjected to this double-pasteurization process a high proportion of spores remained viable and resulted in growth and formation of toxin within 5-9 d at 25 degrees C. To provide an appropriate reduction in the risk o survival and growth of Cl. botulinum, peeled, vacuum-packed potatoes for storage at ambient temperature should be given a heat treatment equivalent to an F(0)3 process. If they are not given such a heat treatment they should be stored at a temperature below 4 degrees C.

References

Jul 1, 1979·Reviews of Infectious Diseases·L D Smith
Jul 1, 1986·The Journal of Applied Bacteriology·A F Graham, B M Lund
Mar 1, 1970·The Journal of Applied Bacteriology·G W Gould
Jun 1, 1974·Archives of Neurology·M Cherington
Apr 19, 1971·JAMA : the Journal of the American Medical Association·D W Ryan, M Cherington
Jan 1, 1983·International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health·K SatoM Ikeda
Oct 1, 1980·The Journal of Hygiene·G R Smith, A M Young
Apr 1, 1981·American Journal of Epidemiology·J E SealsJ M Hughes
Aug 1, 1981·Journal of Food Protection·S NotermansM J H Keijbets
Dec 1, 1981·Journal of Food Protection·H SugiyamaColleen Movroydis

Citations

Jan 1, 1992·Society for Applied Bacteriology Symposium Series·B M Lund
Sep 15, 2004·International Journal of Food Microbiology·M Del TorreM W Peck
May 16, 2003·Journal of Food Protection·A BraconnierF Carlin
Oct 17, 2002·Journal of Food Protection·Linda V ThomasJoss Delves-Broughton
May 29, 2000·Journal of Food Protection·C H Doan, P M Davidson

Related Concepts

Botulinum Toxins
Clostridium botulinum
Food Microbiology
Food Preservation
Solanum tuberosum

Related Feeds

Botulism (ASM)

Botulism is a rare but serious paralytic illness caused by a nerve toxin that is produced by the bacterium clostridium botulinum. Discover the latest research on botulism here.

Botulism

Botulism is a rare but serious paralytic illness caused by a nerve toxin that is produced by the bacterium clostridium botulinum. Discover the latest research on botulism here.