PMID: 7766071Mar 1, 1995

Growth and toxin production by non-proteolytic and proteolytic Clostridium botulinum in cooked vegetables

Letters in Applied Microbiology
F Carlin, M W Peck

Abstract

Growth and toxin production by proteolytic and non-proteolytic strains of Clostridium botulinum have been followed in 28 cooked puréed vegetables prepared under strict anaerobic conditions and incubated at 30 degrees C for up to 60 d. Toxin production was confirmed in 25 of the cooked vegetables inoculated with a suspension of spores of proteolytic strains of types A and B, and in 13 inoculated with a suspension of spores of non-proteolytic strains of types B, E and F. For both proteolytic and non-proteolytic strains, a trend was identified correlating growth and toxin production with the pH of the cooked puréed vegetables.

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Citations

Mar 29, 2006·IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks·Gavin C CawleyM W Peck
Sep 15, 2004·International Journal of Food Microbiology·M Del TorreM W Peck
Feb 17, 2006·International Journal of Food Microbiology·M LindströmH Korkeala
Jul 15, 2009·Advances in Food and Nutrition Research·Keith WarrinerKari Dunfield
May 16, 2003·Journal of Food Protection·A BraconnierF Carlin
May 1, 1999·Applied and Environmental Microbiology·S C StringerM W Peck

Related Concepts

Bacterial Toxins
Clostridium botulinum
Hot Temperature
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Vegetables

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