h-channels contribute to divergent electrophysiological properties of supragranular pyramidal neurons in human versus mouse cerebral cortex

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Brian E KalmbachJonathan T Ting

Abstract

Gene expression studies suggest that differential ion channel expression contributes to differences in rodent versus human neuronal physiology. We tested whether h-channels more prominently contribute to the physiological properties of human compared to mouse supragranular pyramidal neurons. Single cell/nucleus RNA sequencing revealed ubiquitous HCN1-subunit expression in excitatory neurons in human, but not mouse supragranular layers. Using patch-clamp recordings, we found stronger h-channel-related membrane properties in supragranular pyramidal neurons in human temporal cortex, compared to mouse supragranular pyramidal neurons in temporal association area. The magnitude of these differences depended upon cortical depth and was largest in pyramidal neurons in deep L3. Additionally, pharmacologically blocking h-channels produced a larger change in membrane properties in human compared to mouse neurons. Finally, using biophysical modeling, we provided evidence that h-channels promote the transfer of theta frequencies from dendrite-to-soma in human L3 pyramidal neurons. Thus, h-channels contribute to between-species differences in a fundamental neuronal property.

Related Concepts

Study
GABRQ gene
Membrane
Sequence Determinations, RNA
Neurons
Patch Clamp
PDZK1 gene
HCN1 gene
Cell Nucleus
Gene Expression

Related Feeds

BioRxiv & MedRxiv Preprints

BioRxiv and MedRxiv are the preprint servers for biology and health sciences respectively, operated by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Here are the latest preprint articles (which are not peer-reviewed) from BioRxiv and MedRxiv.

CZI Human Cell Atlas Seed Network

The aim of the Human Cell Atlas (HCA) is to build reference maps of all human cells in order to enhance our understanding of health and disease. The Seed Networks for the HCA project aims to bring together collaborators with different areas of expertise in order to facilitate the development of the HCA. Find the latest research from members of the HCA Seed Networks here.

Allen Institute for Brain Science Network

The Allen Institute for Brain Science Network is a not-for-profit biomedical research organization that provides open access to multiple neuroscience tools and resources. Find the latest research from tjr Allen Institute for Brain Science Network here.

Barrel cortex

Here is the latest research on barrel cortex, a region of somatosensory and motor corticies in the brain, which are used by animals that rely on whiskers for world exploration.