PMID: 4944802Dec 1, 1971Paper

Heat resistance of spores of marine and terrestrial strains of Clostridium botulinum type C

Applied Microbiology
W P Segner, C F Schmidt

Abstract

Resistance to heat of spores of marine and terrestrial strains of Clostridium botulinum type C in 0.067 m phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) was determined. The marine strains were 6812, 6813, 6814, and 6816; the terrestrial strains were 468 and 571. The inoculum level equaled 10(6) spores/tube with 10 replicate tubes for each time-temperature variable. Heating times were run at three or more temperatures to permit survival of some fraction of the inoculum. Survivors were recovered at 85 F (30 C) in beef infusion broth containing 1% glucose, 0.10% l-cysteine hydrochloride, and 0.14% sodium bicarbonate. D values were calculated for each fractional survivor end point after 6 months of incubation. Thermal resistance curves were constructed from the D value data. D(220) (104 C) values for spores of 468 and 571 equaled 0.90 and 0.40 min, respectively. The corresponding values for spores of 6812, 6813, 6814, and 6816 were 0.12, 0.04, 0.02, and 0.08 min. The z values for the thermal resistance curves ranged from 9.0 to 11.5 F (5.0 to 6.2 C).

Related Concepts

Bacteriological Techniques
Carbonic Acid Ions
Botulinum Toxins
Ampholytes
Bos indicus
Clostridium botulinum
Cysteine Hydrochloride
Glucose, (beta-D)-Isomer
Orthophosphate
Seawater

Related Feeds

Botulism (ASM)

Botulism is a rare but serious paralytic illness caused by a nerve toxin that is produced by the bacterium clostridium botulinum. Discover the latest research on botulism here.

Botulism

Botulism is a rare but serious paralytic illness caused by a nerve toxin that is produced by the bacterium clostridium botulinum. Discover the latest research on botulism here.