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How the tortoise beats the hare: Slow and steady adaptation in structured populations suggests a rugged fitness landscape in bacteria

bioRxiv

Jun 3, 2014

Joshua R NahumBenjamin Kerr

Abstract

Abstract In the context of Wright’s adaptive landscape, genetic epistasis can yield a multipeaked or “rugged” topography. In an unstructured population, a lineage with selective access to multiple peaks is expected to rapidly fix on one, which may not be the highest peak. Contrarily, be...read more

Mentioned in this Paper

STAB2 gene
Migration, Cell
Hares (mammal)
Antibiotics
Evolution, Molecular
Turtle
Adaptation
Patterns
Corneal Topography
Simulation
5
9
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How the tortoise beats the hare: Slow and steady adaptation in structured populations suggests a rugged fitness landscape in bacteria

bioRxiv

Jun 3, 2014

Joshua R NahumBenjamin Kerr

PMID: 990005793

DOI: 10.1101/005793

Abstract

Abstract In the context of Wright’s adaptive landscape, genetic epistasis can yield a multipeaked or “rugged” topography. In an unstructured population, a lineage with selective access to multiple peaks is expected to rapidly fix on one, which may not be the highest peak. Contrarily, be...read more

Mentioned in this Paper

STAB2 gene
Migration, Cell
Hares (mammal)
Antibiotics
Evolution, Molecular
Turtle
Adaptation
Patterns
Corneal Topography
Simulation
5
9

Related Papers

Paper Details
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