Mar 25, 2020

Ibudilast enhances the clearance of SOD1 and TDP-43 aggregates through TFEB-mediated autophagy and lysosomal biogenesis: The new molecular mechanism of ibudilast and its implication for neuroprotective therapy

Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Yanming ChenQingzhi Gao

Abstract

A key feature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and other neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease (AD), Parkinson disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD) is abnormal aggregation and deposition of misfolded proteins. Previous studies have shown that autophagy plays an important role in the clearance of disease-linked protein aggregates. In the current study, we report that ibudilast, which is a non-selective inhibitor of phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and an anti-inflammation drug, can induce autophagy and lysosomal biogenesis through mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 - transcription factor EB (mTORC1-TFEB) signaling. We have found that ibudilast significantly enhances the clearance of disease-linked TAR DNA binding protein (TDP-43) and superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) protein aggregates in transfected cellular models carrying corresponding gene mutations. The mechanistic study revealed that ibudilast could markedly enhance TFEB nuclear translocation and increase the autolysosomes by inhibiting mTORC1 activity. We have also demonstrated that ibudilast could protect TDP-43-induced cytotoxicity in motor neuron-like NSC-34 cells. Collectively, our study identifies ibudilast as an autophagy enhancer and provide...Continue Reading

  • References
  • Citations

References

  • We're still populating references for this paper, please check back later.
  • References
  • Citations

Citations

  • This paper may not have been cited yet.

Mentioned in this Paper

Huntington Disease
Ibudilast
DNA-Binding Proteins
Autolysosome
Motor Neurons
Study
Cu-Zn Superoxide Dismutase
TARDBP
Protein Aggregation, Pathological
Mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1

Related Feeds

Autophagy: Cancer & Parkinson (MDS)

Autophagy leads to degradation of damaged proteins and organelles by the lysosome. Impaired autophagy has been implicated in several diseases. Here is the role of autophagy in cancer and Parkinson’s.

Autophagy & Model Organisms

Autophagy is a cellular process that allows degradation by the lysosome of cytoplasmic components such as proteins or organelles. Here is the latest research on autophagy & model organisms

ALS: Therapies

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neuron disease, is associated with the death of neurons that control voluntary muscles. Discover the latest research on ALS therapies here.

Autophagy & Disease

Autophagy is an important cellular process for normal physiology and both elevated and decreased levels of autophagy are associated with disease. Here is the latest research.

ALS: Prions

Prions are misfolded proteins which characterize several fatal neurodegenerative diseases. Prion-like mechanisms are associated with the pathogenesis of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Here are the latest discoveries pertaining to this disease.

ALS

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neuron disease, is associated with the death of neurons that control voluntary muscles. Discover the latest research on ALS here.

ALS - Pathogenic Mechanisms

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by muscle weakness. Here is the latest research investigating pathogenic mechanisms that underlie this genetically heterogeneous disorder.

Autophagy: Cancer & Parkinson

Autophagy leads to degradation of damaged proteins and organelles by the lysosome. Impaired autophagy has been implicated in several diseases. Here is the role of autophagy in cancer and Parkinson’s.