Jul 19, 2003

Immunizations with pneumococcal surface protein A and pneumolysin are protective against pneumonia in a murine model of pulmonary infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae

The Journal of Infectious Diseases
David E BrilesWilliam H Benjamin

Abstract

Intranasal infection of mice with certain strains of capsular group 19 Streptococcus pneumoniae can result in focal pneumonia in the absence of bacteremia. Using this model of murine pneumonia, we demonstrated that immunization with recombinant forms of either pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) or PdB (a genetically detoxified derivative of pneumolysin) elicited significant protection against focal pulmonary infection. This may be the first demonstration that a proposed vaccine antigen can protect against pneumococcal pneumonia. The best protection was obtained by immunizing mice with a mixture of PspA and PdB, indicating that the protection elicited by these antigens can complement each other. This result is in agreement with previous studies that used pneumococcal sepsis and nasal colonization models and demonstrate that the best protein vaccines for prevention of infection may be those that include more than one protection-eliciting pneumococcal protein.

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Mentioned in this Paper

Mice, Inbred CBA
Septicemia due to Streptococcus Pneumoniae
Bacterial Proteins
Variolation
Lung
Semisynthetic Vaccines
Infectious Disease of Lung
Pneumococcal surface protein A
Vaccines
Murine

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