Immunohistochemical characterization of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in canine normal testis and testicular tumours

Journal of Comparative Pathology
M SozmenM Yarim

Abstract

Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors belonging to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. Recent studies have demonstrated that PPARs regulate lipid metabolism and are expressed in various cancers. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of PPAR-α, -β and -γ in normal canine testicular tissue and canine testicular tumours (CTTs). Expression of PPAR-α, -β and -γ was greater (P <0.05) than in normal testicular tissue. PPARs were therefore induced in CTTs and they may play a role in the biology of these tumours.

References

Nov 1, 1990·The Journal of Endocrinology·A J GrootenhuisF H de Jong
Oct 1, 1994·International Journal of Cancer. Journal International Du Cancer·H O AdamiM Rahu
Nov 1, 1993·Food and Chemical Toxicology : an International Journal Published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association·P BentleyH J Wiegand
Mar 15, 1996·International Journal of Cancer. Journal International Du Cancer·T ZhengP Boyle
Oct 29, 1997·Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America·I M Verma, J Stevenson
Dec 3, 1999·Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology·E K Maloney, D J Waxman
Nov 23, 2000·Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America·R A GuptaRaymond N DuBois
Mar 7, 2001·Antioxidants & Redox Signaling·I RusynR G Thurman
Sep 21, 2001·Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications·K InoueHajime Sano
Jan 15, 2002·Journal of Reproduction and Fertility. Supplement·M A PetersF J van Sluijs
Dec 20, 2002·Cancer·Katherine A McGlynnRobert E Tarone
Dec 19, 2003·Modern Pathology : an Official Journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc·Perkins MukunyadziChun-Yang Fan
Jan 7, 2004·Nature Reviews. Cancer·Liliane MichalikW Wahli
Jun 12, 2004·Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care·Zaher Nahlé
Feb 26, 2008·Journal of Comparative Pathology·V GriecoM Finazzi
Jun 21, 2008·American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology·Tetyana V PedchenkoPierre P Massion
Jun 28, 2008·PPAR Research·Keisuke TachibanaTakefumi Doi
Jun 3, 2009·The Journal of Clinical Investigation·Raghu Kalluri, Robert A Weinberg
Oct 28, 2009·Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology·Masayuki ShimodaAkira Orimo

Related Concepts

Related Feeds

Cancer Metabolic Reprogramming (Keystone)

Cancer metabolic reprogramming is important for the rapid growth and proliferation of cancer cells. Cancer cells have the ability to change their metabolic demands depending on their environment, regulated by the activation of oncogenes or loss of tumor suppressor genes. Here is the latest research on cancer metabolic reprogramming.

Apoptosis in Cancer

Apoptosis is an important mechanism in cancer. By evading apoptosis, tumors can continue to grow without regulation and metastasize systemically. Many therapies are evaluating the use of pro-apoptotic activation to eliminate cancer growth. Here is the latest research on apoptosis in cancer.

Cancer Metabolic Reprogramming

Cancer metabolic reprogramming is important for the rapid growth and proliferation of cancer cells. Cancer cells have the ability to change their metabolic demands depending on their environment, regulated by the activation of oncogenes or loss of tumor suppressor genes. Here is the latest research on cancer metabolic reprogramming.

Apoptosis

Apoptosis is a specific process that leads to programmed cell death through the activation of an evolutionary conserved intracellular pathway leading to pathognomic cellular changes distinct from cellular necrosis

Angiogenesis Inhibitors to Treat Cancer

Cancer treatments including angiogenesis inhibitors prevent tumor cells from receiving nutrients and oxygen. Here is the latest research on angiogenesis inhibitors for the treatment of cancer.