Oct 25, 2018

Impact of mutation rate and selection at linked sites on DNA variation across the genomes of humans and other homininae

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
David CastellanoKasper Munch

Abstract

DNA diversity varies across the genome of many species. Variation in diversity across a genome might arise from regional variation in the mutation rate, variation in the intensity and mode of natural selection, and regional variation in the recombination rate. We show that both non-coding and non-synonymous diversity are positively correlated to a measure of the mutation rate and the recombination rate and negatively correlated to the density of conserved sequences in 50KB windows across the genomes of humans and non-human homininae. Interestingly, we find that while non-coding diversity is equally affected by these three genomic variables, non-synonymous diversity is mostly dominated by the density of conserved sequences. The positive correlation between diversity and our measure of the mutation rate seems to be largely a direct consequence of regions with higher mutation rates having more diversity. However, the positive correlation with recombination rate and the negative correlation with the density of conserved sequences suggests that selection at linked sites also affect levels of diversity. This is supported by the observation that the ratio of the number of non-synonymous to non-coding polymorphisms is negatively correl...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

Genetic Drift
Gene Polymorphism
Study
Conserved Sequence
Size
Patterns
Genome
Genes
Genomic Stability
Recombination, Genetic

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