Improved performance of the modified Hodge test with MacConkey agar for screening carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacilli

Journal of Microbiological Methods
Kyungwon LeeYunsop Chong

Abstract

The detection of carbapenemases in Gram-negative bacilli is important for optimal patient treatment and to control spread of the resistance. The modified Hodge test can detect carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacilli. In this study, we compared the performance of MacConkey agar and Mueller-Hinton agar for metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) and OXA carbapenemase screening. Overall, the performance of Hodge test was better with MacConkey agar due to enhanced release of β-lactamases from the cells in the presence of bile compounds. Concomitant use of the modified Hodge test could resolve most of the problems with uncertain double-disk synergy tests in MBL detection.

References

May 12, 2004·Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease·Jing-Jou YanChin-Luan Chuang
May 26, 2005·Protein Expression and Purification·F William Studier
Feb 1, 2006·The Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy·Jan Walther-Rasmussen, Niels Høiby
Jun 22, 2007·Journal of Clinical Microbiology·K F AndersonJ B Patel
Dec 19, 2008·International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents·Kyungwon LeeUNKNOWN KONSAR Group

❮ Previous
Next ❯

Citations

Mar 30, 2011·Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy·Juwon KimKyungwon Lee
Nov 26, 2011·Journal of Clinical Microbiology·Delphine GirlichPatrice Nordmann
Sep 23, 2014·Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy : Official Journal of the Japan Society of Chemotherapy·Sofiane BakourJean-Marc Rolain
Jun 6, 2014·Microbial Drug Resistance : MDR : Mechanisms, Epidemiology, and Disease·Sofiane BakourJean-Marc Rolain
Jul 15, 2015·Expert Review of Anti-infective Therapy·Charbel Al-BayssariJean-Marc Rolain
Jan 3, 2012·Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease·Kyungwon LeeGian M Rossolini
May 4, 2013·Journal of Medical Microbiology·Wafaa JamalLaurent Poirel
Oct 12, 2014·Journal of Microbiological Methods·D HammoudiD Karam Sarkis
May 13, 2014·Clinical Microbiology and Infection : the Official Publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases·J HrabákC C Papagiannitsis
Feb 21, 2014·Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases·Laura JánváriÁkos Tóth
Jan 15, 2015·Microbial Drug Resistance : MDR : Mechanisms, Epidemiology, and Disease·Najla MathlouthiJean-Marc Rolain
Jan 15, 2015·Microbial Drug Resistance : MDR : Mechanisms, Epidemiology, and Disease·Sofiane BakourJean-Marc Rolain
Aug 28, 2014·Infection, Genetics and Evolution : Journal of Molecular Epidemiology and Evolutionary Genetics in Infectious Diseases·Ivan BarišićHerbert Wiesinger-Mayr
Apr 18, 2012·Clinical Microbiology and Infection : the Official Publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases·P NordmannUNKNOWN European Network on Carbapenemases
May 25, 2016·International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents·Najla MathlouthiChedly Chouchani
Nov 8, 2013·BMC Microbiology·Erica Lourenço FonsecaAna Carolina P Vicente
Mar 16, 2017·APMIS : Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica, Et Immunologica Scandinavica·Hany HashemAlaa Saad
Oct 13, 2017·Microbial Drug Resistance : MDR : Mechanisms, Epidemiology, and Disease·Amira BouazizJean-Marc Rolain
Aug 22, 2018·Microbial Drug Resistance : MDR : Mechanisms, Epidemiology, and Disease·Rym LalaouiJean-Marc Rolain
Oct 22, 2011·The Korean journal of laboratory medicine·Kyoung Ho RohKyungwon Lee
Apr 25, 2017·Microbial Drug Resistance : MDR : Mechanisms, Epidemiology, and Disease·Amel AbderrahimAlix Pantel
Feb 1, 2017·Jundishapur Journal of Microbiology·Hany HashemAlaa Saad
Jul 12, 2017·Microbial Drug Resistance : MDR : Mechanisms, Epidemiology, and Disease·Najla MathlouthiChedly Chouchani

❮ Previous
Next ❯

Related Concepts

Related Feeds

Carbapenems

Carbapenems are members of the beta lactam class of antibiotics and are used for the treatment of severe or high-risk bacterial infections. Discover the latest research on carbapenems here.

Carbapenems (ASM)

Carbapenems are members of the beta lactam class of antibiotics and are used for the treatment of severe or high-risk bacterial infections. Discover the latest research on carbapenems here.

Aminoglycosides

Aminoglycoside is a medicinal and bacteriologic category of traditional Gram-negative antibacterial medications that inhibit protein synthesis and contain as a portion of the molecule an amino-modified glycoside. Discover the latest research on aminoglycoside here.

Antifungals

An antifungal, also known as an antimycotic medication, is a pharmaceutical fungicide or fungistatic used to treat and prevent mycosis such as athlete's foot, ringworm, candidiasis, cryptococcal meningitis, and others. Discover the latest research on antifungals here.

Aminoglycosides (ASM)

Aminoglycoside is a medicinal and bacteriologic category of traditional Gram-negative antibacterial medications that inhibit protein synthesis and contain as a portion of the molecule an amino-modified glycoside. Discover the latest research on aminoglycoside here.

Antifungals (ASM)

An antifungal, also known as an antimycotic medication, is a pharmaceutical fungicide or fungistatic used to treat and prevent mycosis such as athlete's foot, ringworm, candidiasis, cryptococcal meningitis, and others. Discover the latest research on antifungals here.

Acinetobacter Infections

Acinetobacter infections have become common in hospitalized patients, especially in the intensive care unit setting and are difficult to treat due to their propensity to develop antimicrobial drug resistance. Discover the latest research on Acinetobacter Infections here.