In situ replication rates for uncultivated bacteria in microbial communities

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Christopher T BrownJillian F Banfield

Abstract

Culture-independent microbiome studies have revolutionized our understanding of the complexity and metabolic potential of microbial communities, but information about in situ growth rates has been lacking. Here, we show that bacterial replication rates can be determined using genome-resolved metagenomics without requirement for complete genome sequences. In human infants, we detected elevated microbial replication rates following administration of antibiotics, and bacterial growth rate anomalies prior to the onset of necrotizing enterocolitis. We studied microorganisms in subsurface communities and determined that a diverse group of groundwater-associated bacteria typically exhibit slow growth rates, despite significant changes in geochemical conditions. All microbiome studies will be advanced by measurements of replication rates that can identify actively growing populations, track organism responses to changing conditions, and provide growth rate information needed for modeling.

Related Concepts

Antibiotics
Genome
Virus Replication
Population Group
Administration Procedure
Study
Genomic Observation

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