PMID: 8559195Jul 1, 1995Paper

In vitro antifungal activity of Polyporaceae against yeasts and dermatophytes

Mycoses
M D SteinmetzC Andary

Abstract

The antifungal activity of 38 Polyporaceae sensu lato against yeasts and dermatophytes was tested in vitro by the agar dilution method. Strains were typed organisms and clinical isolates. In this first report, Pycnoporellus fulgens (Fr.) Donk was found to be the most active species against pathological fungi and showed broad-spectrum antifungal activity against yeasts (Candida albicans, Candida glabrata) and dermatophytes (Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Trichophyton rubrum, Microsporum canis, Microsporum gypseum, Epidermophyton floccosum). Other Polyporaceae species also showed antifungal activity, but only against dermatophytes.

References

Jan 1, 1989·Advances in Applied Microbiology·S C Jong, R Donovick
Aug 21, 1987·Pharmaceutisch Weekblad. Scientific Edition·A M JanssenA Baerheim Svendsen
Feb 1, 1994·Planta medica·A FavelG Balansard

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Citations

Oct 19, 2002·International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents·E Xylouri-FrangiadakiG Bryoni
May 4, 2005·Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz·Janine de Aquino LemosMaria do Rosário Rodrigues Silva
May 3, 2011·Polish Journal of Veterinary Sciences·W WawronM Szczubiał

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