Jun 27, 2013

Individual variation in thermogenic capacity is correlated with flight muscle size but not cellular metabolic capacity in American goldfinches (Spinus tristis)

Physiological and Biochemical Zoology : PBZ
D L SwansonMarisa O King

Abstract

Abstract Cold tolerance and overwinter survival are positively correlated with organismal thermogenic capacity (=summit metabolic rate [Msum]) in endotherms. Msum varies seasonally in small-bird populations and may be mechanistically associated with variation in flight muscle size or cellular metabolic capacity, but the relative roles of these traits as drivers of individual variation in thermogenic performance are poorly known. We measured flight muscle size by ultrasonography, pectoralis and supracoracoideus muscle masses, and muscular activities of key aerobic enzymes (citrate synthase, carnitine palmitoyl transferase, and β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase) and correlated these measurements with Msum for individual American goldfinches (Spinus tristis) to test the hypotheses that muscle size and/or cellular metabolic capacity serve as prominent drivers of individual variation in organismal metabolic capacity. Ultrasonographic flight muscle size was weakly positively correlated with Msum ([Formula: see text]). Both log10-transformed Msum and flight muscle mass were significantly correlated with log10 body mass, so we calculated allometric residuals for log Msum and for log flight muscle mass to test their correlation independen...Continue Reading

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  • Citations19
  • References22
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Citations

Mentioned in this Paper

Metabolic Process, Cellular
Enzymes, antithrombotic
Energy Metabolism
Entire Pectoral Muscle
Tomography, Ultrasonic
Soleus Muscle Structure
Enzymes for Treatment of Wounds and Ulcers
Metabolic Rate
Muscle
Citrate (si)-Synthase

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