PMID: 43114Nov 1, 1979

Ineffectiveness of erythromycin for treatment of Haemophilus vaginalis-associated vaginitis: possible relationship to acidity of vaginal secretions

Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
M A DurfeeK K Holmes

Abstract

To assess the efficacy of oral erythromycin in the treatment of nonspecific vaginitis (NSV), conducted a nonrandom, unblinded pilot study among 17 women with symptoms and signs of NSV. At the completion of treatment, 10 of 13 patients had persistent symptoms, 9 of 13 had persistent abnormal discharge, and 11 of 13 had persistently positive cultures for Haemophilus vaginalis. Ten patients with persistent or relapsing NSV and four who did not complete erythromycin treatment were retreated with oral metronidazole, and 14 of 14 showed clinical improvement and eradication of H. vaginalis. The susceptibility of 27 clinical isolates of H. vaginalis to erythromycin was determined at pH 5.5, 6.0, 6.5, and 7.0. The minimal inhibitory concentration of erythromycin for H. vaginalis was approximately 10-fold higher at pH 5.5 than at pH 7.0. Erythromycin is not effective for the treatment of H. vaginalis-associated NSV; this may be partly attributable to the reduced activity of this drug in acidic vaginal secretions.

References

Apr 1, 1976·Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences·B G Boggiano, M Gleeson
Jun 29, 1978·The New England Journal of Medicine·T A PheiferK K Holmes
May 1, 1979·The Journal of Clinical Investigation·K C ChenK K Holmes

Citations

Aug 1, 1984·European Journal of Clinical Microbiology·K Machka
Oct 1, 1982·European Journal of Clinical Microbiology·M J Balsdon
Oct 1, 1982·European Journal of Clinical Microbiology·S ShankerR Munro
Sep 11, 1980·The New England Journal of Medicine·C A SpiegelK K Holmes
May 11, 2000·Obstetrical & Gynecological Survey·J A McGregor, J I French
Jul 1, 1981·Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy·D Horne, A Tomasz
Sep 1, 1983·Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy·E J GoldsteinV L Sutter
Feb 1, 1987·Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy·C A Spiegel
Dec 1, 1993·Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy·A B KharsanyJ Van den Ende
Jan 1, 1997·Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology : the Journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology·J I AdinmaC N Unaeze
Oct 1, 1991·American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology·J A McGregorK Seo
Nov 1, 1990·American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology·J A McGregorJ Schoonmaker
Aug 1, 1993·American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology·D A Eschenbach
Oct 1, 1991·American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology·J L ThomasonN J Scaglione
Sep 1, 1988·British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology·M VejtorpS S Schrøder
Oct 26, 2010·International Journal of Pharmaceutics·Jin-Wook YooChi H Lee
Nov 16, 2007·The Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research·Atef DarwishMohammad H Makarem
Apr 1, 1994·The Annals of Pharmacotherapy·J R Schlicht

Related Concepts

Ilotycin
Haemophilus Infections
Gardnerella vaginalis
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Fungus Drug Sensitivity Tests
Vagina
Vaginitis

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