Mar 27, 2020

Inflammatory and oxidative status in European captive black rhinoceroses: a link with Iron Overload Disorder?

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Hanae PouillevetL. Jaillardon

Abstract

Iron Overload Disorder (IOD) is a syndrome developed by captive browsing rhinoceroses like black rhinoceroses (Diceros bicornis ) in which hemosiderosis settles in vital organs while free iron accumulates in the body, potentially predisposing to various secondary diseases. Captive grazing species like white rhinoceroses (Ceratotherium simum ) do not seem to be affected. The pro-oxidant and pro-inflammatory properties of iron, associated with the poor antioxidant capacities of black rhinoceroses, could enhance high levels of inflammation and oxidative stress leading to rapid ageing and promoting diseases. In this prospective study, 15 black (BR) and 29 white rhinoceroses (WR) originating from 22 European zoos were blood-sampled and compared for their i ron status (serum iron), liver/muscle biochemical parameters (AST, GGT, cholesterol), inflammatory status (total proteins, protein electrophoresis) and oxidative stress markers (SOD, GPX, dROMs). Results showed higher serum iron and liver enzyme levels in black rhinoceroses (P<0.01), as well as higher GPX (P<0.05) and dROM (P<0.01) levels. The albumin/globulin ratio was lower in black rhinoceroses (P<0.05) due to higher 2 -globulin levels (P<0.001). The present study suggests a hi...Continue Reading

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