PMID: 788635Jul 1, 1976

Influence of postirradiation incubation temperature on recovery of radiation-injured Clostridium botulinum 62A spores

Applied and Environmental Microbiology
M S ChowdhuryH S Levinson

Abstract

The number of colonies formed by unirradiated Clostridium botulinum 62A spores was independent of temperature, in the range from 20 to 45 degrees C (in 5 degrees C increments); no colonies developed at 50 degrees C. Spores irradiated at 1.2 or 1.4 Mrads produced more macrocolonies at 40 degrees C than at higher or lower temperatures. Apparently, radiation-injured spores were capable of repair of 40 degrees C than at the other temperatures studied. More than 99% of the radiation (1.2 Mrads) survivors were injured and were unable to form macrocolonies in the presence of 5% NaCl. The germinated radiation-injured spores were also sensitive to dilution, resulting in the loss of viability of 77 to 79% of the radiation survivors. At 30 and 40 degrees C, the irradiated spores did not differ significantly in the extent of germination (greater than 99% at both 30 and 40 degrees C), emergence (64% at 30 degrees C and 67% at 40 degrees C), and the maximum number of emerged cells that started to elongate (69% at 30 degrees C and 79% at 40 degrees C). However, elongation was remarkably more extensive at 40 degrees C than at 30 degrees C. Many elongated cells lysed within 48 h at 30 degrees C, indicating an impaired repair mechanism. If the r...Continue Reading

Citations

Jan 15, 1993·FEMS Microbiology Letters·N D Williams, A D Russell
Jan 22, 2000·Journal of Food Protection·M L BariT Uemura

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