Inhibition of Escherichia coli translocation from the gastrointestinal tract by normal cecal flora in gnotobiotic or antibiotic-decontaminated mice.

Infection and Immunity
R D Berg

Abstract

Escherichia coli C25 maintained population levels of 10(9) to 10(10) per g of cecum and translocated to 100% of the middle mesenteric lymph nodes in gnotobiotic mice monoassociated with E. coli C25. Intragastric inoculation of these mice with the cecal contents from specific-pathogen-free mice reduced the population levels of E. coli C25 to 10(6) per g of cecum and completely inhibited translocation to the mesenteric lymph nodes. Intragastric inoculation with heat-treated, Formalintreated, or filtered cecal contents did not reduce the population levels of E. coli C25 or reduce the incidence of translocation of E. coli C25 to the mesenteric lymph nodes. Thus, viable bacteria apparently are required in the cecal contents inocula to reduce the population levels and the incidence of translocation of E. coli C25. Treatment with streptomycin plus bacitracin decreased the anaerobic bacterial levels in these gnotobiotic mice, allowing increased population levels of E. coli C25 and increased translocation to the mesenteric lymph nodes. E. coli C25 also translocated to the mesenteric lymph nodes of specific-pathogen-free mice treated with streptomycin and bacitracin before colonization with E. coli C25. The high cecal population levels o...Continue Reading

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