Inhibition of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by an in vitro continuous-flow culture containing human stool microflora

FEMS Microbiology Letters
Nicole J PultzCurtis J Donskey

Abstract

We used an in vitro continuous-flow culture model of human stool microflora to examine the ability of human stool microflora to inhibit growth of two methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains. Continuous-flow cultures consistently eliminated MRSA inocula of 10(6) cfu/mL within 4 days, and addition of continuous-flow culture resulted in elimination of a pre-established MRSA culture ( approximately 10(8) cfu/mL) within 6-8 days. Anaerobic or "aerobic" (i.e., continuous bubbling of room air to eliminate obligate anaerobes) cultures eliminated MRSA at similar rates. The MRSA strains were unable to replicate under anaerobic conditions in sterile filtrates produced from the continuous-flow culture, but rapid growth occurred when glucose was added. These data demonstrate that indigenous stool microflora efficiently eliminate MRSA colonization and obligate anaerobes are not essential for inhibition. Our findings also suggest that inhibition of MRSA in continuous-flow cultures is due to depletion of nutrients rather than production of inhibitory conditions.

References

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Sep 27, 2003·Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology : the Official Journal of the Society of Hospital Epidemiologists of America·Anita BhallaCurtis J Donskey

Related Concepts

Aerobiosis
Anaerobiosis
Interference, Bacterial
Feces
Staphylococcus aureus
Methicillin-Resistant

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