Inhibitory effect of kanamycin on evoked transmitter release. Reversal by 3,4-diaminopyridine

European Journal of Pharmacology
J MolgoP Lechat

Abstract

The effect of kanamycin (Kn) on evoked transmitter release was examined in frog end-plates in vitro. By a presynaptic action, Kn (0.02 to 1 mM) significantly reduced the amount of acetylcholine liberated by nerve stimulation. In addition to its presynaptic effects, Kn (0.96 mM) decreased the size of the miniature end-plate potentials possibly by acting at the postsynaptic level. 3,4-Diaminopyridine (4.5 microM) reversed the presynaptic effects of Kn but did not modify its postsynaptic action.

References

May 1, 1980·Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology·W Weide, K Löffelholz
Oct 17, 1980·European Journal of Pharmacology·N N Durant, I G Marshall
Jan 1, 1982·General Pharmacology·W E Glover
Jan 1, 1980·Neuroscience·S Thesleff
Oct 1, 1994·British Journal of Pharmacology·R S Redman, E M Silinsky
Mar 12, 2002·Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research = Revista Brasileira De Pesquisas Médicas E Biológicas·W A Prado, E B Machado Filho
Jan 24, 1980·Nature·A B Kroese, J van den Bercken

Citations

Jun 1, 1978·Biophysical Journal·G E Kirsch, T Narahashi
May 1, 1972·European Journal of Pharmacology·K L DretchenJ P LONG
May 1, 1959·Toxicology·J C TIMMERMANC B PITTINGER

Related Concepts

Structure of Sciatic Nerve
Neurosteroids
Resting Potentials
Salientia
Neurohormones
Kantrex
Rana esculenta
Motor Endplate
Nerve-Muscle Preparation
In Vitro [Publication Type]

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