Oct 25, 2018

Insertion sequences drive the emergence of a highly adapted human pathogen

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Erwin SentausaIna Attree

Abstract

Taxonomic outliers of Pseudomonas aeruginosa of environmental origin have recently emerged as infectious for humans. Here we present the first genome-wide analysis of an isolate that caused fatal hemorrhagic pneumonia. We demonstrate that, in two sequential clones, CLJ1 and CLJ3, recovered from a patient with chronic pulmonary disease, insertion of a mobile genetic element into the P. aeruginosa chromosome affected major virulence-associated phenotypes and led to increased resistance to antibiotics used to treat the patient. Comparative proteome and transcriptome analyses revealed that this insertion sequence, ISL3, disrupted genes encoding flagellar components, type IV pili, O-specific antigens, translesion polymerase and enzymes producing hydrogen cyanide. CLJ3 possessed seven fold more IS insertions than CLJ1, some modifying its susceptibility to antibiotics by disrupting the genes for the outer-membrane porin OprD and the regulator of β-lactamase expression AmpD. In the Galleria mellonella larvae model, the two strains displayed different levels of virulence, with CLJ1 being highly pathogenic. This work reveals ISs as major players in enhancing the pathogenic potential of a P. aeruginosa taxonomic outlier by modulating both...Continue Reading

  • References
  • Citations

References

  • We're still populating references for this paper, please check back later.
  • References
  • Citations

Citations

  • This paper may not have been cited yet.

Mentioned in this Paper

Genome-Wide Association Study
AMPD1
Hydrogen Cyanide
Polymerase
Pseudomonas aeruginosa (antigen)
OPRD1 gene
Outer Membrane
Genes
Enzymes, antithrombotic
Antibiotic throat preparations

About this Paper

Related Feeds

Antifungals (ASM)

An antifungal, also known as an antimycotic medication, is a pharmaceutical fungicide or fungistatic used to treat and prevent mycosis such as athlete's foot, ringworm, candidiasis, cryptococcal meningitis, and others. Discover the latest research on antifungals here.

Antifungals

An antifungal, also known as an antimycotic medication, is a pharmaceutical fungicide or fungistatic used to treat and prevent mycosis such as athlete's foot, ringworm, candidiasis, cryptococcal meningitis, and others. Discover the latest research on antifungals here.

BioRxiv & MedRxiv Preprints

BioRxiv and MedRxiv are the preprint servers for biology and health sciences respectively, operated by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Here are the latest preprint articles (which are not peer-reviewed) from BioRxiv and MedRxiv.