Jul 1, 1977

Intracranial hemorrhage and amphetamine usage. Review of the effects of amphetamines on the central nervous system

Angiology
E R Olsen

Abstract

A 25-year-old man died after an intravenous injection of 100 mg of methedrine. Postmortem studies showed visceral congestion, lung edema, pericardial petechiae, centrolobular necrosis of the liver, and diffuse subarachnoid blood, intracranial vasculitis and cerebritis in the absence of aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations or chronic hypertension. A review of the English-language literature produced 3 other cases of fatal amphetamine-induced intracranial hemorrhage and seven nonfatal cases. Some were the result of overdose, others of hypersensitivity. Angiographic evidence suggests that such hemorrhages result from the development of fibrinoid necrosis and the formation of microaneurysms in the small intracerebral vessels.

  • References15
  • Citations16

References

  • References15
  • Citations16

Citations

Mentioned in this Paper

Vasculitis
Petechiae
Pulmonary Edema
Necrosis
Amphetamine
Autopsy
Intravenous Injections
Aneurysm
Pericardial Sac Structure
Entire Central Nervous System

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