Oct 1, 1994

Investigation of a pseudo-outbreak of orthopedic infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology : the Official Journal of the Society of Hospital Epidemiologists of America
W FormanT Fekete

Abstract

To report a pseudoepidemic of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections discovered during an investigation of postoperative joint infections. A retrospective review of case patients' hospital charts, operative reports, and laboratory data, as well as environmental culturing, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotyping of outbreak isolates, and in vitro analysis of P aeruginosa growth characteristics. A 510-bed, university-affiliated adult tertiary care hospital. Between October 1 and December 1, 1992, seven postsurgical joint infections were diagnosed, including four caused by P aeruginosa. A bottle of "sterile" saline used to process tissue specimens was found to be contaminated with P aeruginosa. Further investigation revealed that P aeruginosa had grown from seven additional tissue cultures, all of which had been processed with the contaminated saline. PCR ribotypes of the contaminant matched those of the clinical isolates. In vitro, P aeruginosa strains were viable in commercial nonbacteriostatic saline, but never caused visible turbidity. Six patients received antibiotics for their presumed infections; four patients had peripherally inserted central catheters placed, and one experienced severe anaphylactic reactions to several anti...Continue Reading

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References

Mentioned in this Paper

Pseudomonas Infections
Drug Impurity
Morbidity Aspects
Pseudomonas aeruginosa (antigen)
Antibiotic throat preparations
Pseudo brand of pseudoephedrine
Antifungal Antibiotics, Topical
Disease Outbreaks
Etiology
Antibiotics, Gynecological

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