Is the dynamic gait index a useful outcome to measure balance and ambulation in patients with cerebellar ataxia?

Gait & Posture
Rachel ReoliAmy J Bastian

Abstract

Ataxia can adversely affect balance and gait and increase the incidence of falls, which puts individuals at greater risk for injury. Thus, interventions focused on balance and gait are integral in rehabilitation training. In order to determine if rehabilitation interventions are effective, we need an outcome measure to detect change. To our knowledge, no activity level outcome measures have been established for balance and gait in cerebellar ataxia. The aim of the current study is to determine the reliability and validity of the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI) for ataxia. Twenty adult participants (23-84 years) with ataxia were evaluated to assess construct validity, inter-rater reliability, and same day test-retest reliability of the DGI. Participants completed ataxia-specific impairment level outcome measures, as well as the DGI. In addition to the in-person rater, three additional physical therapists scored video recordings of DGI test and retests. Construct validity was assessed via Spearman's rank order correlation coefficient (Spearman's rho) between the impairment measures (Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA), International Cooperative of Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS) and the DGI. Reliability was assessed by Spearman...Continue Reading

References

Jul 1, 1996·Journal of Neurophysiology·A J BastianW T Thach
Aug 1, 1997·Physical Therapy·A Shumway-CookW Gruber
Oct 31, 2003·Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation·Diane M WrisleyBarry Strasnick
Feb 24, 2004·Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society·Elsdon StoreyAndrew Churchyard
May 25, 2004·The Neuroscientist : a Review Journal Bringing Neurobiology, Neurology and Psychiatry·Susanne M Morton, Amy J Bastian
Jan 11, 2005·Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation·Jennifer McConvey, Susan E Bennett
Jan 13, 2005·Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society·Bart P C van de WarrenburgBastiaan R Bloem
Jun 14, 2006·Neurology·T Schmitz-HübschRoberto Fancellu
Jun 27, 2006·Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy : JNPT·Courtney D Hall, Susan J Herdman
Oct 26, 2006·Physical Therapy·Gregory F Marchetti, Susan L Whitney
Sep 14, 2007·Disability and Rehabilitation·Davide CattaneoStefania Repetti
Oct 30, 2007·Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation·Johanna Jonsdottir, Davide Cattaneo
May 8, 2009·Age and Ageing·Rebecca Boyd, Judy A Stevens
Jul 31, 2010·Stroke; a Journal of Cerebral Circulation·Jau-Hong LinChing-Lin Hsieh
Mar 26, 2011·Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair·Zahra KadivarJan M Hondzinski
Aug 30, 2011·Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation·Line R JønssonCarsten Juhl
Oct 4, 2011·The Cerebellum·Jonas Alex Morales SauteUNKNOWN Iberoamerican Multidisciplinary Network for the Study of Movement Disorders (RIBERMOV) Study Group
Feb 15, 2014·Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair·Jennifer L Keller, Amy J Bastian
Oct 27, 2017·International Journal of MS Care·Susan E BennettPaulette Niewczyk

❮ Previous
Next ❯

Related Concepts

Related Feeds

Ataxias (MDS)

Ataxia is a neurological condition characterized by lack of voluntary coordination of muscle movements including loss of coordination, balance, and speech. Discover the latest research on ataxia here.

Ataxias

Ataxia is a neurological condition characterized by lack of voluntary coordination of muscle movements including loss of coordination, balance, and speech. Discover the latest research on different types of ataxias here.

Ataxia telangiectasia (MDS)

Ataxia telangiectasia is a rare neurodegenerative diseases caused by defects in the ATM gene, which is involved in DNA damage recognition and repair pathways. Here is the latest research on this autosomal recessive disease.

Ataxia

Ataxia is a neurological condition characterized by lack of voluntary coordination of muscle movements including loss of coordination, balance, and speech. Discover the latest research on ataxia here.