Mar 7, 2020

Lack of efficient killing of purified dormant spores of Bacillales and Clostridiales species by glycerol monolaurate in a non-aqueous gel

Letters in Applied Microbiology
J GreenPeter Setlow

Abstract

Inactivation of Bacillales and Clostridiales spores is of interest, since some cause food spoilage and human diseases. A recent publication (mSphere 3: e00597-1, 2018) reported that glycerol monolaurate (GML) in a non-aqueous gel (GMLg) effectively killed spores of Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus and Clostridioides difficile, and Bacillus anthracis spores to a lesser extent. We now show that (i) the B. subtilis spores prepared as in the prior work were impure; (ii) if spore viability was measured by diluting spores 1/10 in GMLg, serially diluting incubations 10-fold and spotting aliquots on recovery plates, there was no colony formation from the 1/10 to 1/1000 dilutions due to GMLg carryover, although thorough ethanol washes of incubated spores eliminated this problem and (iii) GMLg did not kill highly purified spores of B. subtilis, B. cereus, Bacillus megaterium and C. difficile in 3-20 h in the conditions used in the recent publication. GMLg also gave no killing of crude B. subtilis spores prepared as in the recent publication in 5 h but gave ~1·5 log killing at 24 h. Thus, GMLg does not appear to be an effective sporicide, although the gel likely inhibits spore germination and could kill spores somewhat upon long incubat...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

Spores, Fungal
Problem
Gel
Spore Germination
Bacillales
Bacillus megaterium
Glyceryl monolaurate
Colony (Cells or Organisms)
Bone Plates
Bacillus anthracis

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