PMID: 108646Jun 1, 1979

Lead poisoning. A comprehensive review and report of a case

Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, and Oral Pathology
N C GordonL S Hansen

Abstract

Lead, a ubiquitous heavy metal which has realized increased use, can cause poisoning by environmental contamination in either its organic or its inorganic form. Lead poisoning can be either acute or chronic, with the latter being the more common. The clinical signs and symptoms of lead poisoning are nonspecific, resulting in a difficult diagnostic problem, especially when it is not industrially related. On occasions, the dentist or oral surgeon may be the first to see an afflicted patient because of oral manifestations.

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