Apr 2, 2016

Lethal Gene Drive Selects Inbreeding

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
James J. Bull

Abstract

The use of 'selfish' gene drive systems to suppress or even extinguish populations has been proposed on theoretical grounds for almost half a century. Creating these genes has recently become possible with CRISPR technology. One seemingly feasible approach, originally proposed by Burt, is to create a homing endonuclease gene (HEG) that inserts into an essential gene, enabling heterozygote viability but causing homozygote lethality. With 100\% segregation distortion in gametes, such genes can cause profound population suppression if resistance does not evolve. Here, population genetic models are used to consider the evolution of inbreeding (specifically selfing) as a possible response to a recessively lethal HEG with complete segregation distortion. Numerical analyses indicate a rich set of outcomes, but selfing often evolves in response to the HEG, with a corresponding partial restoration of mean fitness. Whether selfing does indeed evolve and its effect in restoring fitness depends heavily on the magnitude of inbreeding depression. Overall, these results point toward an underappreciated evolutionary response to block the harmful effects of a selfish gene. They raise the possibility that extreme population suppression may be mo...Continue Reading

  • References
  • Citations

References

  • We're still populating references for this paper, please check back later.
  • References
  • Citations

Citations

  • This paper may not have been cited yet.

Mentioned in this Paper

Genes
CRISPR-Cas Systems
Endonuclease
3-hydroxy-3-ethylglutaryl-coenzyme A
HEG1
Visual Suppression
Gametes
Resistance Process
Metabolic Suppression
Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats

About this Paper

Related Feeds

BioRxiv & MedRxiv Preprints

BioRxiv and MedRxiv are the preprint servers for biology and health sciences respectively, operated by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Here are the latest preprint articles (which are not peer-reviewed) from BioRxiv and MedRxiv.

CRISPR (general)

Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are DNA sequences in the genome that are recognized and cleaved by CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas). CRISPR-Cas system enables the editing of genes to create or correct mutations. Discover the latest research on CRISPR here.

CRISPR Ribonucleases Deactivation

CRISPR-Cas system enables the editing of genes to create or correct mutations. This feed focuses on mechanisms that underlie deactivation of CRISPR ribonucleases. Here is the latest research.

CRISPR Genome Editing & Therapy (Preprints)

CRISPR-Cas system enables the editing of genes to create or correct mutations. This feed focuses on the application of this system for gene editing and therapy in human diseases.

CRISPR for Genome Editing (Preprints)

Genome editing technologies enable the editing of genes to create or correct mutations. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are DNA sequences in the genome that are recognized and cleaved by CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas). Here are the latest preprints on the use of CRISPR-Cas system in gene editing.

CRISPR for Genome Editing

Genome editing technologies enable the editing of genes to create or correct mutations. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are DNA sequences in the genome that are recognized and cleaved by CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas). Here is the latest research on the use of CRISPR-Cas system in gene editing.

Related Papers

Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health
James J. Bull
Evolution; International Journal of Organic Evolution
Christina A Muirhead
BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
James J. BullStephen M Krone
Evolution; International Journal of Organic Evolution
Russell Lande, Douglas W Schemske
© 2020 Meta ULC. All rights reserved