Jul 5, 1975

Lipoprotein X in hepatobiliary diseases

Schweizerische medizinische Wochenschrift
R C MordasiniG Riva

Abstract

The diagnostic and prognostic reliability of lipoprotein-X (Lp-X) in demonstrating or ruling out cholestasis has been evaluated in a group of 80 patients with diseases of the liver and/or the biliary tracts, and in 103 subjects with various other diseases. The results of Lp-X detection were compared with the so-called "enzymes indicating cholestasis": alkaline phosphatase, leucine arylamidase, and gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase. Where possible a histologic specimen of the liver was obtained. The correlation between Lp-X and "enzymes indicating cholestasis" was satisfactory in more than 90% of cases. When compared with the histologic findings, Lp-X proved to be more reliable than the enzymes. Despite this fact, Lp-X did not show absolute specifity in the detection of cholestasis as there were several negative results in cases with histologically proven cholestasis. Furthermore, the differentiation of intra- and extrahepatic cholestasis was not possible on the basis of Lp-X. In the control group of 103 patients with other than hepatobiliary diseases, a positive Lp-X result was found in 3 cases. Further investigations in these three patients revealed that primarily unsuspected hepatobiliary disease could not be ruled out. In the fol...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

Biliary Tract Diseases
Gamma-glutamyl transferase
Cholestasis, Extrahepatic
Aminopeptidase
Alkaline Phosphatase
Cholestasis
Lipoproteins
Liver Dysfunction
GGT1

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