Long-term follow-up of severely symptomatic women with adenomyoma treated with combination therapy

Taiwanese Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology
Wei-Min LiuChii-Ruey Tzeng

Abstract

The aim of our study was to assess the long-term efficacy of conservative surgery combined with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist therapy for uterine adenomyoma. We carried out an uncontrolled descriptive study of 285 women who had symptomatic uterine adenomyoma. A total of 186 women with pathologically proven adenomyoma underwent ultramini-laparoscopic adenomyomectomy and a 6-month course of goserelin acetate treatment, and were evaluated semi-annually during a follow-up period of at least 3 years. Patient scores for dysmenorrhea using a self-reported six-point verbal numeric rating scale significantly declined compared with the baseline assessment, from 3.84 ± 0.65 to 0.33 ± 0.57, 0.52 ± 0.86, and 0.88 ± 1.29 at the end of the 1-, 2-, and 3-year follow-up visits, respectively (p < 0.001). Similar reductions were observed for analgesic usage scores. Menorrhagia scores significantly decreased compared with the baseline assessment, from 3.45 ± 1.46 to 0.42 ± 0.59, 0.65 ± 0.83, and 1.1 ± 1.34 at the end of the 1-, 2-, and 3-year follow-up visits, respectively (p < 0.001). Combination therapy for adenomyoma provides an effective treatment option for long-term symptom control and uterine preservation in severely symptomatic wo...Continue Reading

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Citations

Nov 3, 2015·Taiwanese Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology·Yi-Jen ChenUNKNOWN Taiwan Association of Gynecology Systematic Review Group
Dec 17, 2014·The Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research·Yong-Soon KwonKyong Shil Im

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