PMID: 9588369May 20, 1998Paper

Low airloss hydrotherapy versus standard care for incontinent hospitalized patients

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
R G BennettW B Greenough

Abstract

To determine whether low airloss hydrotherapy reduces the incidence of new skin lesions associated with incontinence in hospitalized patients and results in more rapid healing of existing pressure sores compared with standard care. To assess subjectively patient and nursing satisfaction related to using low airloss hydrotherapy beds. Randomized, prospective, unblinded study. Acute and chronic hospital wards. A total of 116 newly admitted, incontinent, hospitalized patients with and without existing pressure sores. Low airloss hydrotherapy compared with treatment on hospital beds and mattresses ordered by the patient's attending physician. Incidence rates of new skin lesion development, e.g., pressure sores, candidiasis, and chemical irritation; improvement in existing pressure sore size, volume, and status; subjective assessment of patient and nursing satisfaction. Possible hypothermia was identified in two patients during the first week of the study, and patient and nursing dissatisfaction with low airloss hydrotherapy remained high throughout the first months of the study. Therefore, two major modifications in the initial protocol were made: (1) increased patient temperature monitoring for hypothermia was initiated in Week 2 ...Continue Reading

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Citations

Nov 28, 2007·Journal of Advanced Nursing·Dimitri BeeckmanTom Defloor
May 20, 1998·Journal of the American Geriatrics Society·B A Ferrell
May 31, 2001·The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences·D R Thomas
Jun 19, 2003·Journal of the American Medical Directors Association·D R Thomas
Dec 14, 2011·The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews·Elizabeth McInnesSally Em Bell-Syer
Nov 15, 2016·The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews·Dimitri BeeckmanSofie Verhaeghe
May 25, 2002·Orthopaedic Nursing·S J Brown
Feb 13, 2014·The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews·Elizabeth McGinnis, Nikki Stubbs
Oct 12, 2018·The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews·Elizabeth McInnesVannessa Leung
Sep 4, 2015·The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews·Elizabeth McInnesNicky Cullum
May 27, 2003·Postgraduate Medicine·T S Dharmarajan, Shamim Ahmed
May 11, 2021·The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews·Chunhu ShiElizabeth McInnes
May 11, 2021·The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews·Chunhu ShiElizabeth McInnes
May 18, 2021·The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews·Chunhu ShiElizabeth McInnes
Jun 8, 2021·The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews·Chunhu ShiElizabeth McInnes
Jun 8, 2021·The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews·Chunhu ShiElizabeth McInnes

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