Malaria Chemoprophylaxis and Self-Reported Impact on Ability to Work: Mefloquine Versus Doxycycline

Journal of Travel Medicine
Andrew G TerrellDavid A Ross

Abstract

It is well known that both mefloquine and doxycycline are commonly associated with adverse effects when taken for malaria chemoprophylaxis. However, the relative impact of these on travelers' ability to work is not so well understood. The aim of this study was to identify which drug has a lesser impact on the ability to work as measured by self-reported severity of adverse effects via a questionnaire. This was a questionnaire-based two-arm cohort study. Participants were soldiers selected from 10 consecutive units training in Kenya during 2012 and 2013. The exposure was either doxycycline or mefloquine and the main outcome measure was impact upon ability to work. Each cohort was advised to take doxycycline or mefloquine with exceptions at the individual level where medically or occupationally advised. Significantly more (p < 0.0001) doxycycline users reported that one or more adverse effects had interfered with their ability to do their job than mefloquine users. Of the 867 mefloquine users, who reported on the impact of adverse effects, 109 (12.6%) reported that one or more adverse effects had impacted upon their ability to do their job, compared to 152 (22.2%) of the 685 doxycycline users who had reported on the impact of any...Continue Reading

References

Jul 1, 1989·Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene·E C ReisingerM Dietrich
Apr 3, 1993·Lancet·H O LobelC C Campbell
Jan 1, 1993·Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America·P Kozarsky, M Eaton
Jun 1, 1996·The Journal of Infectious Diseases·A P Hopperus BumaP A Kager
Aug 1, 1996·Tropical Medicine & International Health : TM & IH·P SchlagenhaufD Stürchler
Aug 1, 1996·The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene·C A JaspersP A Kager
Mar 1, 1997·Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene·A M CroftM J World
Jan 1, 1997·European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology·C HoebeC Thijs
Mar 1, 1996·Journal of Travel Medicine·M A Phillips, R B Kass
Sep 24, 1999·Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene·M S PeragalloG Sarnicola
Aug 31, 2001·Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America·D OverboschUNKNOWN Malarone International Study Team
Sep 21, 2002·European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology·M M van RiemsdijkB H Ch Stricker
Oct 23, 2002·Tropical Medicine & International Health : TM & IH·Frédéric PagèsDominique Baudon
Feb 22, 2005·The Medical Journal of Australia·Scott J KitchenerMichael D Edstein
Sep 1, 2005·Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy : Official Journal of the Japan Society of Chemotherapy·Takeshi MatsumuraTetsuya Nakamura
Feb 13, 2007·Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease·Nick J Beeching, David R Hill
Sep 11, 2007·American Journal of Preventive Medicine·Christine KorhonenPaul Jung

❮ Previous
Next ❯

Citations

Feb 7, 2016·Journal of Travel Medicine·Remington L Nevin
Nov 19, 2015·Journal of Parasitology Research·Remington L Nevin
Oct 31, 2017·The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews·Maya Tickell-PainterDavid Sinclair
Jun 30, 2016·Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps·Oliver QuantickD Ross
May 23, 2020·BMJ Military Health·David Ross
Jun 13, 2019·Revista Da Sociedade Brasileira De Medicina Tropical·Karis Maria de Pinho RodriguesGuilherme Santoro-Lopes

❮ Previous
Next ❯

Related Concepts

Related Feeds

Antimalarial Agents (ASM)

Antimalarial agents, also known as antimalarials, are designed to prevent or cure malaria. Discover the latest research on antimalarial agents here.

Antimalarial Agents

Antimalarial agents, also known as antimalarials, are designed to prevent or cure malaria. Discover the latest research on antimalarial agents here.