PMID: 589173Nov 19, 1977

Malaria in Nottingham children

British Medical Journal
N Rutter

Abstract

In five and a half years 16 children were admitted to hospital in Nottingham suffering from malaria. Thirteen cases were caused by Plasmodium vivax and two by P falciparum, and in one the type was not identified. All were children of immigrant parents, predominantly from Pakistan, although most were born in England but had been visiting Asia. Three children were ill on or soon after arrival, but in the others the onset of symptoms was delayed by up to nine months. All made an uneventful recovery, although two children with P vivax infections had a further relapse after chloroquine treatment only. The question "Where have you been?" should be put to all immigrant parents whose children have a febrile illness. Agencies who provide travel for Asian immigrant families returning home for a visit should be encouraged to provide instructions about malaria prophylaxis.

References

Jun 29, 1974·British Medical Journal·L J Bruce-ChwattC C Draper
Jul 27, 1974·British Medical Journal·B Maegraith
Dec 3, 1966·British Medical Journal·H M Gilles

Citations

Jun 1, 1980·Social Science & Medicine. Medical Geography·J M Goldsmid
Dec 1, 1990·Journal of Adolescence·K BrownA Kinsella
Oct 1, 1987·Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology·R G Hendrickse

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