DOI: 10.1101/503623Dec 21, 2018Paper

Maternal psychosocial risk factors and offspring gestational epigenetic age acceleration in a South African birth cohort study

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Nastassja KoenDan J Stein

Abstract

Epigenetic age (EA) acceleration is associated with higher risk of chronic disease and mortality in adults. However, little is known about whether and how in utero exposures might shape gestational EA acceleration at birth. We aimed to explore associations between maternal psychosocial risk factors and offspring gestational EA acceleration at birth in a South African birth cohort study - the Drakenstein Child Health Study. Maternal psychosocial risk factors included trauma/stressor exposure; posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); depression, psychological distress; and alcohol/tobacco use. Offspring gestational EA acceleration at birth was calculated using an epigenetic clock previously devised for neonates. Bivariate linear regression was used to explore unadjusted associations between maternal risk factors and offspring gestational EA acceleration at birth. A stepwise regression method was then used to determine the best multivariable model for adjusted associations. Data from 272 maternal-offspring dyads were included in the current analysis. In the stepwise regression model, maternal trauma exposure (β = 7.92; p<0.01) or PTSD (β = 7.46; p<0.01) were significantly associated with offspring gestational EA acceleration at birth...Continue Reading

Related Concepts

Birth
Chronic Disease
Mental Depression
Regression Analysis
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
African, South
Head Circumference
Shapes
Analysis
Stratification

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