Nov 2, 2019

MCP1-CCR2 and neuroinflammation in the ALS motor cortex with TDP-43 pathology

Journal of Neuroinflammation
Javier H JaraP Hande Özdinler

Abstract

The involvement of non-neuronal cells and the cells of innate immunity has been attributed to the initiation and progression of ALS. TDP-43 pathology is observed in a broad spectrum of ALS cases and is one of the most commonly shared pathologies. The potential involvement of the neuroimmune axis in the motor cortex of ALS patients with TDP-43 pathology needs to be revealed. This information is vital for building effective treatment strategies. We investigated the presence of astrogliosis and microgliosis in the motor cortex of ALS patients with TDP-43 pathology. prpTDP-43A315T-UeGFP mice, corticospinal motor neuron (CSMN) reporter line with TDP-43 pathology, are utilized to reveal the timing and extent of neuroimmune interactions and the involvement of non-neuronal cells to neurodegeneration. Electron microscopy and immunolabeling techniques are used to mark and monitor cells of interest. We detected both activated astrocytes and microglia, especially rod-like microglia, in the motor cortex of patients and TDP-43 mouse model. Besides, CCR2+ TMEM119- infiltrating monocytes were detected as they penetrate the brain parenchyma. Interestingly, Betz cells, which normally do not express MCP1, were marked with high levels of MCP1 expr...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

Treatment Protocols
Parenchyma
Neurons
TARDBP
Astrocytes
Nerve Degeneration
Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1
Neuroglia
Motor Neurons
Immunolabeling Techniques

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