Measurement of inflammatory mediators of eosinophils and lymphocytes in blood in acute asthma: serum levels of ECP influence the bronchodilator response

International Archives of Allergy and Immunology
Gabriele Di LorenzoC Caruso

Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the relevance of immunoinflammatory markers on the response to short acting beta(2)-agonist in acute asthma exacerbation. Thus, we measured serum eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) levels and sIL-2R at acute exacerbation in 52 adult patients with atopic asthma, and assessed forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) before and after the administration of aerosolized salbutamol. After a cumulative dose of salbutamol causing a 10% improvement in FEV(1) from baseline [CD10, i.e. cumulative doses of salbutamol (800 microg) causing an improvement in FEV(1) from baseline to 10%] the patients were divided into two groups: group A with CD <10 and group B with CD >10. The bronchodilator response, as defined by a DeltaFEV(1) (percentage of predictive value of FEV(1)) of > or =10 predictive value, was shown by 40% of the patients. After 200, 400 and 800 microg of salbutamol, significant differences of FEV(1) with respect to baseline values were, respectively, p = 0.049, 0.0039 and 0.0014. In contrast, no significant difference of the means of FEV(1) between the doses of salbutamol was observed. Significant differences of DeltaFEV(1) between 200 and 400 microg (p = 0.0002) and between 200 and 800 microg (p ...Continue Reading

Citations

Sep 19, 2003·The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology·Yutaka NakanoHirotoshi Nakamura
May 14, 2008·Current Opinion in Pediatrics·Jason B Caboot, J L Allen
Feb 6, 2003·American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine·Gloria C KooIrwin I Singer
Nov 20, 2013·Clinical and Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology·S CianchettiP Paggiaro
Jul 25, 2006·The Journal of Pediatrics·Karl P SylvesterAnne Greenough
Dec 23, 2006·Pediatric Pulmonology·Karl P SylvesterAnne Greenough
Jan 31, 2007·Pediatric Pulmonology·Karl P SylvesterAnne Greenough
Oct 10, 2006·International Journal of Immunopathology and Pharmacology·G Di LorenzoG B Rini

Related Concepts

Teens
Adrenergic beta-Agonists
Proventil
Asthma
Serum Proteins
Broncholytic Effect
Forced Expiratory Volume Function
Immunoglobulin E
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Hypersensitivity Skin Testing

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